Information Systems Education Conference
ISECON Proceedings

2010 ISECON Proceedings

Paper Titles | Authors | Tracks | Best Papers | Panels | Teaching Cases | Workshops
Conference Highlights/Program

Information Systems Teaching Cases


BI GIS Competition Brings DSS to AITP NCC

Roger Hayen
roger.hayen@cmich.edu
Central Michigan University


Friday - 10/29/2010 in Davidson B at 11:30 am
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1366.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
A national competition problem in business intelligence (BI) is considered to provide an understanding of this competition and the case study problem used. This competition utilizes a commercially available, hosted software application that includes a rich econometric data set. The data are accessed using spatial queries and produce more than four dozen views of the data through predefined reports. Once the queries occur, the data can be analyzed further with other BI tools that include Microsoft Excel. The competition problem requires this analysis of external business data to furnish information for business decision making. This competition has been successful for the past for years. The experience of this competition can be applied to case-based, experiential learning in decision support systems and related information system courses that include a BI component. This usage of the competition problem has been found to work well in several of these courses and should be considered by others for similar courses.

Recommended Citation: Hayen, R., (2010). "BI GIS Competition Brings DSS to AITP NCC ". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1366, Nashville, TN.


Creating and Using a Computer Networking and Systems Administration Laboratory Built Under Relaxed Financial Constraints

Michael Conlon
michael.conlon@sru.edu
Slippery Rock University

Paul Mullins
paul.mullins@sru.edu
Slippery Rock University


Saturday - 10/30/2010 in Capitol 2/3 at 4:30 pm
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1328.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
The Computer Science Department at Slippery Rock University created a laboratory for its Computer Networks and System Administration and Security courses, under relaxed financial constraints. This paper describes the department's experience designing and using this laboratory, including lessons learned and descriptions of some student projects performed in the lab.

Recommended Citation: Conlon, M., Mullins, P., (2010). "Creating and Using a Computer Networking and Systems Administration Laboratory Built Under Relaxed Financial Constraints". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1328, Nashville, TN.


Daniel’s Flowers Inventory Management Quandary: Inventory Shrinkage and Depleting Profits

Daniel Schutzbank
Daniel.schutzbank@quinnipiac.edu
Quinnipiac University

Bruce White
Bruce.white@quinnipiac.edu
Quinnipiac University


Friday - 10/29/2010 in Suite 4A&B at 9:00 am
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1483.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
A Manhattan New York florist finds that perishable flowers are thrown out cutting into his profits. He wants a solution that will help keep better tracking on dates of purchase, temperature in storage, and ‘must use by’ dates. The store implements an RFID solution for better control and is pleased with the results.

Recommended Citation: Schutzbank, D., White, B., (2010). "Daniel’s Flowers Inventory Management Quandary: Inventory Shrinkage and Depleting Profits". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1483, Nashville, TN.


Facial Recognition Case

Kelly Tracey
kelly.tracey@quinnipiac.edu
Quinnipiac University

Bruce White
Bruce.white@quinnipiac.edu
Quinnipiac University


Saturday - 10/30/2010 in Capitol 2/3 at 2:45 pm
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1485.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
Facial recognition is a new and emerging technology. It has been used in border security and other security situations. This hypothetical case explores its use in a retail environment as an interface to a customer relationship management (CRM) system. The company is loosing money and wants to stress its customer relationships and is looking at facial recognition as a method to better know and serve their customers.

Recommended Citation: Tracey, K., White, B., (2010). "Facial Recognition Case". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1485, Nashville, TN.


SOLVING RELATIONAL DATABASE PROBLEMS WITH ORDBMS IN AN ADVANCED DATABASE COURSE

Ming Wang
ming.wang@calstatela.edu
California State University, Los Angeles


Saturday - 10/30/2010 in Capitol 2/3 at 11:30 am
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1376.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
This paper introduces how to use the object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) to overcome the relational database (RDB) existing problems and to improve database performance in the database development. The purpose of the paper is to provide a guideline for database instructors who desire to incorporate the ORDB technology in their traditional database courses. The paper presents how to use the specific object-relational database (ORDB) technology to solve normalization problems in 1) Transitive dependency, 2) Multi-value attributes, and 3) Non-1st Normal Form; and also provides the solutions to data complexity problems with specific ORDBMS techniques: 1) object view, 2) object inheritance, and 3) object integration. The paper summarizes the significance and advantages of teaching ORDBMSs in advanced database courses. Course contents and students’ learning outcomes are discussed. To be more helpful to database educators, the paper presents a complete object-relational database development case study from the UML class diagram design to Oracle ORDBMS implementation.

Recommended Citation: Wang, M., (2010). "SOLVING RELATIONAL DATABASE PROBLEMS WITH ORDBMS IN AN ADVANCED DATABASE COURSE ". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1376, Nashville, TN.


Using Business Analysis Software in a Business Intelligence Course

Juan Elizondo
jelizondo@mail.stmarytx.edu
St. Mary's University

Monica Parzinger
mparzinger@stmarytx.edu
St. Mary's University, San Antonio

O. Jim Welch
owelch@stmarytx.edu
St. Mary's University


Saturday - 10/30/2010 in Capitol 2/3 at 4:00 pm
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1345.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
This paper presents an example of a project used in an undergraduate business intelligence class which integrates concepts from statistics, marketing, and information systems disciplines. SAS Enterprise Miner software is used as the foundation for predictive analysis and data mining. The course culminates with a competition and the project is used to enhance communication and presentation skills.

Recommended Citation: Elizondo, J., Parzinger, M., Welch, O., (2010). "Using Business Analysis Software in a Business Intelligence Course". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1345, Nashville, TN.


Website Self-Service Tools: Software Component Acquisition and “Death by a Thousand Cuts”

Paul Witman
witman@ieee.org
California Lutheran University


Friday - 10/29/2010 in Capitol 2/3 at 2:00 pm
http://proc.isecon.org/2010/pdf/1481.pdf

Teaching Case Overview:
Key issue: A project heavily dependent on integration of acquired components slowly and steadily falls behind schedule. Many individual issues are worked, but no single issue triggers a project restart, as was ultimately required. Vendor and buyer maturity issues both contribute to the problems. The case provides a real-world case study for students enrolled in a project management or systems development course. The case describes Online Banking Corporation (OBC), and its efforts to develop a new set of web hosting and maintenance tools for its clients. OBC began the project with the goal of modernizing and consolidating their web hosting platforms. The project leveraged vendor-built portal server software, a new area of technology for OBC, and required selection of a vendor for the server components. It also required specification and construction of software for the end users of the web site (bank customers), and for the site administrators (bank staff). Significant cross-organizational collaboration was required within OBC, along with careful vendor management to ensure that all required features were available, and that the product met the resource constraints required for profitable operation. Key concepts around technology selection, project management, and vendor management come to light as OBC’s new product begins its lifecycle. Both business and technology issues are raised, and students will need to analyze the actions, inactions, and positions of the various players to determine both improved recovery approaches as well as ways to prevent such is-sues in the future.

Recommended Citation: Witman, P., (2010). "Website Self-Service Tools: Software Component Acquisition and “Death by a Thousand Cuts”". The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference, v.27 n. 1481, Nashville, TN.